Squaw Valley: The Name and Proposed Waterpark Remain the Same

Hopefully you saw our April 1 post, the fake press release to remind us how ridiculous Alterra Mountain Company’s plans for Squaw Valley truly are.

No, they are not actually renaming Squaw Valley ‘Waterpark Valley USA!’ (at least as far as we know).

But they did actually claim, in public, that “there is nothing to do here in summer.”

They really do want to build a ten-story indoor waterpark – with the tallest waterslide in North America, along with a series of highrise condo hotels. 

And they even claimed that John Muir would think that’s a good thing.

It’s a dark vision of reckless development that we wish were just a joke.  But is a real-life threat to everything we love about Tahoe.

For ten years, all that’s stood between our mountains and 30 years of development is Sierra Watch and our work to keep Tahoe Truckee True.

It’s an epic story of how we work together to protect our values – on April 1 and every other day of the year.

Squaw Valley development

Pictured: Grassroots supporters standing against overdevelopment in Squaw Valley!

To learn more about Sierra Watch’s commitment to responsible development in Squaw Valley, watch The Movie to Keep Tahoe True: https://youtu.be/Q_RdEW1IOMY

Stand with Sierra Watch and sign the Tahoe Truckee True petition today: https://sierrawatch.org/tahoe-truckee-true/action/

And you can read our announcement in support of finding a name for Squaw Valley that respects our shared history and everyone that comes to the valley for recreation, as well as the switch to our updated Tahoe Truckee True campaign: https://sierrawatch.org/tahoe-truckee-true/name-change/

Lastly, if you think there is nothing to do in the North Lake Tahoe-Truckee Region in the summer, maybe try going for a swim in Lake Tahoe – it’s one of the best outdoor waterparks you’ll ever find.

Alterra Announces New Name for Squaw Valley – Press Release

For Immediate Release:

ALTERRA MOUNTAIN COMPANY ANNOUCES NEW NAME FOR SQUAW VALLEY

Waterpark Valley USA! to be marketed worldwide

Olympic Valley, Calif. – The owners of Alterra Mountain Company gathered today in the parking lot of Squaw Valley to announce the new name for the famed ski resort: Waterpark Valley USA!

Flanked by executives of Alterra’s parent company, KSL Capital Partners, celebrity CEO Randy Mirth made the special announcement.

“I’ve always said that Tahoe is the last bastion of undercapitalized, undermanaged, and undermarketed grouping of resorts in North America. There is no place like Tahoe for opportunity,” Mirth told the crowd of Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows employees paid to be there.

Standing in front of the former movie theatre and bar first built for the 1960 Olympics known as the Far East Building, Mirth also held a ribbon cutting ceremony to celebrate the future demolition of the building and mark the actual placement of the 90,000 foot, 10-story tall indoor amusement-style waterpark.

Great Wolf Tahoe

“Partnering with Great Wolf Resorts to manage the base of the mountain, we can finally overcapitalize, overmanage, and specifically overmarket this resort with the new name,” Mirth told the shocked crowd.  “Waterpark Valley USA! will be significantly easier to market to overseas tourists.”

When asked for comment, Sierra Watch Executive Director, Tom Mooers, was incredulous, “Hold on to your speedo, Mr. Mirth.  The Tahoe loving community is not going let Alterra tear down the Olympics to build up a waterpark.”

After the conference, Randy Mirth was quick to follow-up, “We’ve been trying to build this waterpark in Squaw Valley – I mean Waterpark Valley USA! – for more than ten years.”

“Maybe if we start calling it Waterpark Valley USA!, then Sierra Watch will give up on their Keep Squaw True / Tahoe Truckee True mission and we can finally make John Muir proud by bringing the ultimate in amusement-style amenities to the Jewel of the Sierra,” he continued.

“As I’ve tried to tell the fine people of Tahoe, there’s nothing to do here in the summer,” chimed in KSL VP of Development, Cheevis Regal. “But with a name like Waterpark Valley USA!, everyone will know they can ‘send it’ off the tallest waterslides in the West!”

“Besides,” he droned on, “Squaw Valley has so much water, a lot of it wasted – as it flows through Squaw Creek and, shockingly, into the Truckee River.  Wouldn’t we rather see that water flowing in an indoor lazy river than in an ol’ mountain stream?”

In their own press release, Sierra Watch reaffirmed their commitment to stop Alterra and KSL from complete buildout of the ski resort:

The leadership pushing KSL’s reckless development proposal may have changed, but the plans remain the same. Alterra still hopes to build a 90,000 square foot indoor waterpark with 1,500 new bedrooms in a series of highrise condos and hotel.

While the new name for Squaw Valley has yet to be announced, we must remain vigilant and remember how all this proposed development would threaten a region already dealing with threats to Lake Tahoe’s clarity, unsustainable traffic, dangerous evacuation routes in times of emergency, and drought.

To learn more about Sierra Watch’s commitment to responsible development in Squaw Valley, watch The Movie to Keep Tahoe Truehttps://youtu.be/Q_RdEW1IOMY

Stand with Sierra Watch and sign the Tahoe Truckee True petition today: https://sierrawatch.org/tahoe-truckee-true/action/

Read our announcement in support of finding a name for Squaw Valley that respects our shared history and everyone that comes to the valley for recreation, as well as on our updated Tahoe Truckee True campaign: https://sierrawatch.org/tahoe-truckee-true/name-change/

Happy April 1st!

About Sierra Watch

Sierra Watch works to protect great places in the Sierra Nevada.  Founded in 2001, the Nevada City based non-profit has built a remarkable track record in land preservation in Tahoe’s Martis Valley, on Donner Summit, and for other treasured Sierra landscapes.  For more information, visit www.sierrawatch.org.

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Our 2021 Resolution to Defend our Mountain Values

What a year!

As we finally put 2020 behind and drop into the New Year, let’s not forget to appreciate our shared perseverance. 

In isolation and anxiety and through tragedy, we’ve made it to 2021.

Emerald Bay, Tahoe Truckee True, resolution

Emerald Bay, Lake Tahoe – Abe Blair Gallery

Here at Sierra Watch, together, we have maintained our stalwart defense of our Tahoe values. We haven’t lost any ground to proposed subdivisions in Martis Valley, to roller coasters and indoor waterparks in Olympic Valley.

In fact we even secured some gains, celebrating the acquisition of land recently proposed for development but, now, protected forever.

Our shared commitment gives us a chance, in the year ahead, to resolve Tahoe’s two biggest development threats.

And that’s our resolution for 2021: to prove that, once again, we can work together to protect the places we love.

Onward into 2021!

Sierra Watch Donate

Reno Gazette-Journal: “North Tahoe property twice threatened by development now permanently protected”

Making sure you’ve seen the great news from North Lake Tahoe: 120 acres on Brockway Summit, recently threatened with development, now permanently protected!

This is how we do it – how we turn development threats into conservation opportunities.

In 2014, Mountainside Partners asked the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency to approve 112 ridgeline houses for the property as part of its original Martis Valley West proposal. Sierra Watch, working with our conservation allies, stood up for our mountains and turned them back.

A year later, they returned with a project they called Brockway Campground, a sprawling resort with 550 campsites and commercial and additional commercial facilities. Once again, we stood with our allies to defend Tahoe, and the project stalled.

As of last week, both projects are moot; the land is protected.

Sierra Watch thanks our allies at the League To Save Lake Tahoe and Mountain Area Preservation – we couldn’t ask for better partners in conservation. And we applaud the U.S. Forest Service, the California Tahoe Conservancy, and Sierra Pacific Industries for seeing the deal through.

Happy Holidays indeed! And we’re already looking forward to the next year continuing our campaigns with Martis Valley West and in Squaw Valley!

Read the article here: https://www.rgj.com/story/news/2020/12/15/tahoe-basin-property-owner-development-protected-forest-service/3898662001/

PRESS RELEASE – Squaw Valley: New Name, Same Fight to Keep “Tahoe Truckee True”

Sierra Watch Logo

Tahoe Truckee True

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For Immediate Release

Contact: Tom Mooers (530) 265-2849 x200

November 19, 2020

SQUAW VALLEY: NEW NAME, SAME FIGHT TO KEEP “TAHOE TRUCKEE TRUE”

Lake Tahoe, Calif. — Although Squaw Valley may be getting a new name, the ongoing fight over proposed development remains.  And conservationists are getting a jump on the resort’s new brand. 

Sierra Watch announced today a new name for its grassroots effort to protect the region’s values as “Tahoe Truckee True.”

“Our commitment to this place remains steadfast,” said Tom Mooers of Sierra Watch.  “And we’ll keep working to defend its values no matter what it’s called, making sure the valley and the region stay Tahoe Truckee True.”

Dr. Robb Gaffney in Squaw Valley Tahoe Truckee True

Pictured: Dr. Robb Gaffney, author of Squallywood, with family representing Tahoe Truckee True

Earlier this year, Alterra Mountain Company announced it will change the name of its resort, characterizing the word squaw as “…deeply rooted in an offensive, demeaning and often violent history.”

The international ski conglomerate, however, has not shown any inclination to change their existing plans to develop the iconic valley, doggedly seeking to remake the region with development of a size and scope Tahoe has never seen.  Development would include a series of high-rise condo hotels and a 90,000 square-foot indoor waterpark—as wide as a Walmart and nearly three times as tall. 

 

Pictured: Iconic Squaw Valley is getting a name and so is the campaign to Keep Squaw True.

The project would take 25 years to construct, add thousands of car trips to Tahoe’s crowded roads, threaten the lake’s famed clarity—and put public safety at risk. 

In the event of wildfire, with all that new development, it would take more than ten hours to evacuate the valley.

In response, conservation non-profit Sierra Watch launched a campaign to Keep Squaw True, recruiting thousands of volunteers in a growing grassroots movement that has, so far, stopped Alterra from pursuing its project – first proposed nine years ago.

“We appreciate Alterra’s willingness to re-consider the history of what we’ve known as Squaw Valley,” says Tom Mooers, Executive Director of Sierra Watch.  “And we’re committed to convincing them to join us in re-imagining its future.”

Keep Squaw True and Tahoe Truckee True Logo

Pictured: There’s a new sticker in town – Sierra Watch unveils the new name of its ongoing campaign.

After the Placer County Board of Supervisors approved Alterra’s proposed development in 2016, Sierra Watch initiated two public interest court challenges to the approvals: one based on state planning law, the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA); the other based on violations of California’s Brown Act.

Sierra Watch’s CEQA challenge is based on decision-makers’ failure to assess the proposed development’s impact on key Tahoe issues like Tahoe clarity, fire safety, and traffic.

Sierra Watch’s Brown Act case challenges Placer County’s last-minute deal with the developers and the California Attorney General, negotiated in secret and announced the same day the project was approved.

Both challenges are on appeal.  In the meantime, Alterra’s development, first proposed nine years ago, is on hold.

“Our goal is not simply to win a lawsuit,” say Mooers of Sierra Watch.  “Our mission is to protect the timeless natural resources of one of our great Sierra places.  No matter what we call it, our values will remain Tahoe Truckee True.”

Tahoe Truckee True in Squaw Valley

Pictured: Sierra Watch supporters in Squaw Valley representing the movement for responsible development.

For more, read Sierra Watch’s message to the organization’s supporters announcing Tahoe Truckee Truehttps://www.sierrawatch.org/tahoe-truckee-true/name-change/

 

About Sierra Watch

Sierra Watch works to protect great places in the Sierra Nevada.  Founded in 2001, the Nevada City based non-profit has built a remarkable track record in land preservation in Tahoe’s Martis Valley, on Donner Summit, and for other treasured Sierra landscapes.  For more information, visit www.sierrawatch.org.

 

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Keeping Squaw Valley and Tahoe True – 4 Years and Counting

Four years ago today, Placer County officials approved massive development for Tahoe’s Squaw Valley.

At a packed hearing in North Lake Tahoe in 2016, hundreds of volunteers turned out to argue against approvals and to Keep Squaw True.

keep squaw true

Yet, somehow, the Placer County Board of Supervisors granted the would-be developer all the entitlements they asked for. Those approvals were not only irresponsible, they were also illegal.

Since then, the proponents of the project have a new name – Alterra Mountain Company. Unfortunately, their plan to remake Tahoe is the same.

But, in case you haven’t noticed, Squaw Valley has no new massive indoor waterpark, no new highrises.

The difference is us. Since the reckless approvals were made four years ago, Sierra Watch has been seeking to overturn Alterra’s nightmare vision for Squaw Valley and secure a better future for Tahoe – in court, at events, and online.

Thanks for being part of that ongoing success. The San Francisco Chronicle covered our story four years ago. And we’re still at it today.

San Francisco Chronicle

Huge Squaw Valley expansion approved, but meets with objections

By Peter Fimrite

November 16, 2016 Updated: November 16, 2016 5:50pm

Tom Mooers, Sierra Watch

Photo: Paul Chinn, The Chronicle – Tom Mooers, executive director of Sierra Watch, walks on the Grove Street Pier at Lake Tahoe in Tahoe City, Calif. on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016. The Placer County Board of Supervisors approved an ambitious expansion plan at the nearby Squaw Valley ski resort which is opposed by Mooers’ group.

A sprawling hotel and resort entertainment complex approved in Squaw Valley has laid bare a cultural, economic and philosophical gulf that has for years bedeviled one of the world’s most picturesque mountain retreats.

The 4-1 vote by the Placer County Board of Supervisors late Tuesday gave the go-ahead to the biggest resort development in Lake Tahoe history — an expansion project that aims to turn the 67-year-old ski area into a year-round destination for the jet set.

The idea is that Squaw Valley will be able to compete with snowy paradises around the country, while immunizing itself from the whims of the drought and the ravages of climate change. But some local residents say the development is so ambitious that it threatens to steamroll the character of the region.

“This is really about our resort re-establishing itself as one of the preeminent resorts in North America,” said Andy Wirth, the president and chief executive officer of the development company, Squaw Valley Ski Holdings.

Squaw Valley Dog

Photo: Paul Chinn, The Chronicle – A dog hangs in the village at Squaw Valley Calif. on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016. The Placer County Board of Supervisors approved an ambitious expansion plan at the nearby Squaw Valley ski resort.

“It sounds like fun,” countered Tom Mooers, the executive director of Sierra Watch, a nonprofit environmental group, “but it doesn’t sound like Tahoe.”

The plan over the next 25 years is to build 850 new hotel, condominium and residential units — with at least one building climbing as high as 10 stories — as well as entertainment complexes and an enormous year-round adventure camp on more than 100 acres of what is now mostly parking lot.

The new Squaw would include skier services, shopping, restaurants, bars, employee housing and parking lots. Thirty-five time-share units would be built near the mouth of Shirley Canyon. The Village at Squaw Valley Specific Plan — five years in the making — would cost as much as $1 billion and, by all accounts, fundamentally change the look and feel of the west side of Lake Tahoe.

Conservationists and many residents in the area see an environmental disaster.

"Tom Mooers" & "Sierra Watch"

Photo: Paul Chinn, The Chronicle – Sierra Watch executive director Tom Mooers walks along the Lake Tahoe shoreline in Tahoe City, Calif., on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016. The Placer County Board of Supervisors approved an ambitious expansion plan at the nearby Squaw Valley ski resort which is opposed by Mooers’ group.

“The history of Tahoe is local jurisdictions making decisions about developments that harm the lake,” said Mooers, who claims the development will clog local roads with traffic, spew sediment into the Truckee River and Lake Tahoe and consume massive amounts of scarce water. “There is a direct connection between this project and our ability to maintain the lake’s clarity and keep Tahoe blue,” he said.

Mooers said he will appeal the project in Placer County Superior Court, arguing that the developers violated the California Environmental Quality Act by not adequately assessing the project’s impacts, particularly the 1,400 daily car trips that traffic engineers say the development will generate.

But it was primarily the resort’s cultural influence that prompted hundreds of people — many wearing purple “Keep Squaw True” T-shirts — to crowd into Tuesday’s marathon hearing in Kings Beach to express their opposition.

The rebuilding of Squaw Valley, they say, will destroy the outdoorsy, back-to-nature feel of their ruggedly beautiful mountain communities. Mooers and others were particularly upset with the project’s signature feature, a 90,000-square-foot Mountain Adventure Camp with bowling alleys, arcades, a movie theater and water features, plus simulated skydiving and rock climbing walls that mimic the great pitches of Yosemite.

The Tahoe experience “is rooted in the appreciation of the great outdoors,” Mooers said. “This would encourage us to send our kids indoors in a 10-story building that would have North America’s largest water slide.”

Village at Squaw Valley Specific Plan Alterra Mountain Company

Photo: Paul Chinn, The Chronicle – A scale model depicts a large development (foreground, with dark gray roofs) planned for the current parking area at Squaw Valley.

The Squaw Valley ski resort was expanded for the 1960 Winter Olympics and was, at the time, one of the great resort destinations in the country. Although the 6,000-acre ski area is still world class, the facilities themselves lag far behind big mountain complexes in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming, Wirth said.

“Since the ’60s, Squaw Valley has fallen,” Wirth said. “We are quite proud of what we have to offer, but it’s frankly, on the competitive landscape, insufficient. The resorts in Colorado and Utah are bigger and have more variety.”

He said Squaw Valley has invested $50 million since 2011 on snowmaking, chair lifts and improvements to the resort village, but the efforts haven’t been nearly enough to compete with the big boys.

The expansion ramped up in 2012, when Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows Ski Resort joined forces and began operating as Squaw Valley Ski Holdings. The combined resorts make up the second-largest ski area in Tahoe behind Heavenly Valley.

Like its Sierra competitors, Squaw Valley has been hit hard by drought. Last year Vail Corp., which owns Tahoe’s Northstar, Heavenly and Kirkwood resorts, reported its annual skier visits were down more than 30 percent since the 2012 season. All of the resorts have been investing in infrastructure and all-season facilities in a bid to entice customers.

The biggest problem at Squaw Valley, Wirth said, is the quality and variety of lodging at the base of the mountain — but the plan approved Tuesday includes much more than that. The adventure center will have a year-round training center for athletes, including the U.S. Ski Team.

Among the development’s supporters is champion moguls skier Jonny Moseley, who won the gold medal at the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan.

“I am one of Squaw’s biggest fans. I tour the country bragging about Squaw,” Moseley said during Tuesday’s hearing. “I really look forward to seeing Squaw reach its full potential … (but) it cannot get there without significant investment in infrastructure.”

Several local parents, meanwhile, said they wanted their children to be able to see performing arts, go to the bowling alley or swim in a lap pool.

Others cited the potential economic benefits to the region. The plan — which is half as big as the first plan proposed in 2011 — is expected to bring in $22 million in tax revenue, $20 million in transit initiatives, and $150 million in new infrastructure, including road, utility and fire service improvements.

The project will also include the restoration of Squaw Creek, which was channelized before the Olympics, and Olympic Channel, which was diverted into a culvert pipe.

Wetland areas and a dog park would be built, according to the plan, and there would be improvements to parks, hiking trails, bicycle paths and playgrounds.

Peter Fimrite is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: pfimrite@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @pfimrite Tahoe True

For our mountains. More than ever.

It’s the time of year when we reach out and ask you to support Sierra Watch.

We make it easy – just click here to donate:

Sierra Watch Donate

And it’s important; these days, we need our mountains more than ever.

The good news is that there are no new subdivisions on the Martis Valley West property in North Tahoe; there is no indoor waterpark in Squaw Valley. But these threats are not going away – and new ones continue to emerge.

For twenty years, Sierra Watch has been proving that the best path forward is to work together to protect the places we love.

In a year when so much has gone wrong, this – our shared commitment to conservation – is going right. And we invite you to be a part of our success.

Donner Summit, Mount Rose Wilderness, Martis Valley

Pictured: From Donner Summit looking out toward Martis Valley, Mount Rose Wilderness, & Tahoe Rim

 

State of Sierra Watch 2020

Each fall we take stock of another year of Sierra Watch and the work we do to defend our mountains. Of course it’s tough to look back on 2020 – when it keeps bearing down on us like a freight train.

Throughout California, we’re suffering the realities of a changing climate – the ravages of wildfire and the threat of drought.

Sierra Nevada

Pictured: California, 2020

For months, smoke in our skies has reminded us: so much of the state is burning; and the rest of us are at risk.

Smoke Tahoe, Smokey Emerald Bay

Pictured: Emerald Bay, 2020

Changing weather patterns are impacting our Sierra snowpack and remaking our watersheds.

Squaw Creek, Squaw Valley, ALterra Mountain Company, Sierra Nevada Drought

Pictured: Squaw Creek, 2020

And then there’s Covid – locking us in our homes, cratering our economy, and inflicting us with the worst health crisis in a century.

Throughout it all, the mountains provide an antidote. Maybe you’ve been able to escape to the trails and the peaks, the streams and lakes – or even just to the simple solace of the smell of pine trees from your own porch.

Five Lakes Trail

Pictured: Five Lakes Trail, 2020

Just knowing that those experiences await us can provide at least some respite in tumultuous times. And, this year more than any, we’re reminded how important it is for us to protect those timeless opportunities from reckless development.

At Sierra Watch, throughout the year, our challenge has been clear: to not lose any of the ground we’ve been fighting for, and to maintain our strength for the times ahead.

Thanks to you – to the hundreds of supporters who have stayed with us and our work to Save Martis Valley and Keep Squaw True, we’re doing it. In a year when so much is going wrong, this – our shared commitment to conservation – is going right.

Alterra Mountain Company, Squaw Valley, Sierra Watch, Keep Squaw True

Pictured: Olympic Valley & Squaw Valley, 2020

There are no new subdivisions on the Martis Valley West property; there is no indoor waterpark in Squaw Valley.

These threats are not going away. But neither is Sierra Watch.

We look forward to the coming year, pivoting out of our quarantine, our recession, and our collective withdrawal and getting back into our communities, our work and, most of all, back into the adventures that await us in our mountains.

Thanks for helping make sure they’ll be ready when we are.

Alterra Mountain Company: Full Steam Ahead for Squaw Valley Development

Alterra Mountain Company may have agreed to change the name of its Squaw Valley ski resort, but it hasn’t changed its plans for massive development in North Tahoe.

Even in the face of community opposition, legal challenges, increasing fire danger, and a global pandemic, it’s business as usual for the Colorado-based ski conglomerate with parent company, KSL Capital Partners, and its plan to remake the region with highrise condo hotels, an indoor waterpark, and a roller coaster.

Squaw Valley, Alpine Meadows, Alterra Mountain Company, Ikon Pass

Pictured: Olympic & Squaw Valley, Fall 2020

The Olympic Valley Public Services District, which serves as Placer County’s local government in the valley, is moving forward with its work to provide water, sewer service, and fire protection for the new development.

Conservationists caution against complacency.

“It’s been nine years since we first saw Alterra’s threat of massive development,” says Tom Mooers of Sierra Watch and the campaign to Keep Squaw True.  “And it’s great that, so far, we’ve stopped them from destroying everything we love about our mountains.  But Alterra Mountain Company has shown no willingness to compromise on a more reasonable development plan and is, instead, hell-bent on cashing in our shared Tahoe values for their own short-term profit.”

Alterra’s development would include a series of high-rise condo hotels and a 90,000 square-foot indoor waterpark—as wide as a Walmart and nearly three times as tall. 

The project would take 25 years to construct, draw down the valley’s limited water supplies, add thousands of car trips to Tahoe’s crowded roads, threaten the lake’s famed clarity—and put public safety at risk. 

Squaw Creek, Olympic Valley, Alpine Meadows

Pictured: An empty Squaw Creek in October

In the event of wildfire, with all that new development, it would take more than ten hours to evacuate the valley.

In response, conservation non-profit Sierra Watch launched a campaign to Keep Squaw True, recruiting thousands of volunteers in a growing grassroots movement that has, so far, stopped Alterra from pursuing its project.

After the Placer County Board of Supervisors approved Alterra’s proposed development in 2016, Sierra Watch initiated two public interest court challenges to the approvals: one based on state planning law, the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA); the other based on violations of California’s Brown Act.

Sierra Watch’s CEQA challenge is based on decision-makers’ failure to assess the proposed development’s impact on key Tahoe issues like Tahoe clarity, fire safety, and traffic.

Sierra Watch’s Brown Act case challenges Placer County’s last-minute deal with the developers and the California Attorney General, negotiated in secret and announced the same day the project was approved.

Both challenges are on appeal.  In the meantime, Alterra seems to be preparing to break ground – if they get a greenlight from the courts.

“Our goal is not simply to win a lawsuit,” says Mooers of Sierra Watch.  “Our hope is to get Alterra to come to the table and work together with the community on a plan we can all be proud of.”                              Alterra Mountain Company

Keeping Nightmare Vision for Squaw Development from Becoming Reality

Seven years ago, we got our first look at the proposed indoor waterpark for Tahoe’s Squaw Valley.

In the newsclip below, the Reno Gazette-Journal called it, “a high-mountain water park on steroids.”

Management has changed; from KSL Capital Partners to Alterra Mountain Company. But the plans remain the same.

The good news is that there is still no indoor waterpark – on steroids or otherwise – in Tahoe.

Standing between Alterra’s Vegas-style vision and the destruction of our mountain values is Sierra Watch and our ongoing campaign to Keep Squaw True.

Thanks for being part of this next great chapter in the long history of Sierra conservation.

Alterra Mountain Company, Ikon Pass, Squaw Valley, Keep Squaw True

Pictured: Article by Jeff Delong, Reno Gazette-Journal

 

Now streaming on YouTube!